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Vedic Astrology & Palmistry

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The Mathematics of Yogas, part 7: Spiritual Yogas

January 2nd, 2019 · No Comments · Astrology, Instruction, Science

Although there are many spiritual yogas defined in the literature of Jyotish, in practice it is surprisingly difficult to find actual charts that meet those specifications. Take, for example, the three classic spiritual yogas defined in Mantreswara’s Phaladeepika (6:28):

When the lord of the Ascendant, the Sun and the Moon occupy an Angle or Trine in their exaltation, own or friendly sign, the resulting Yoga is called Srikanta. When the lord of the 5th, Jupiter and Saturn occupy similar positions, the Yoga formed is known as Virinchi. When the lord of the 9th, Venus and Mercury are similarly placed, the Yoga is termed Srinatha.

These rules are simple enough, but finding a chart that fulfills one of these specifications is rather uncommon. For example, Srikanta will appear in only 2% of charts, Virinchi in 3%, and Srinatha in 3.5%. Thus, the chances of any horoscope having even one out of these three spiritual yogas is only 8.5%, or roughly one person in 12, as shown in the graph below.

There are other yogas that have a distinctly spiritual connotation, eg, Hamsa, Pravrajya and Sannyasin yogas, but many of these are equally difficult to fulfill. For the moment, let’s consider only these three classic yogas as defined in Phaladeepika, and consider what it takes to realize any one of them.

Before doing that, however, consider the following graph, which depicts the likelihood of any chart with a given ascendant having the potential to present even one of these three spiritual yogas.

As you can see, there’s a huge range of probability across the 12 available ascendants, ranging from less than a 5% chance for ascendants Taurus, Aries and Pisces, up to 14% for Aquarius and Virgo. And as can be demonstrated, these are optimistic probabilities, because once we begin to closely examine the prerequisites for each yoga within the confines of a particular ascendant, some of these become quite problematic, often for astronomical reasons.

To follow the logic presented below, you need to know each planet’s own sign, its (desirable) exaltation sign and its (undesirable) debilitation sign. Aside from that, you must also know the so-called friendly signs for each planet, which are dictated by the planetary relationships shown in this table.

We’ll illustrate the logic of these yoga requirements by looking at two different ascendants – Aries, whose overall chances of achieving at least one of the three yogas are less than 5%, and Virgo, whose chances are almost 15%.

Let’s first consider the sign/house configuration for an Aries ascendant, whose template is shown here:

Srikanta requires the Ascendant lord (Mars in this case), along with the Sun and Moon, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

In this case, Mars could be in the 1st (own), 5th (friendly), 9th (friendly) or 10th (exalted). That’s four out of 12 signs, or 33.3%. Meanwhile, the Sun could be in the 1st (exalted), 4th (friendly), 5th (own), or 9th (friendly). That’s also four out of 12 signs, or 33.3%. Finally, the Moon can only be in the 4th (own) or the 5th (friendly). That’s two out of 12, or 16.7%. But in order for Srikanta to exist for this Aries ascendant, all three conditions must co-exist. The odds for that are 0.333 x 0.333 x 0.167 = 1.85%, or less than one person in 50.

Virinchi requires the 5th lord (Sun in this case), along with Jupiter and Saturn, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

We’ve already shown above that, for an Aries ascendant, the Sun can fulfill its requirement 33.3% of the time. Meanwhile, Jupiter could be in the 1st (friendly), the 4th (exalted), the 5th (friendly), or the 9th (own). That’s four out of 12 signs, or 33.3%. Finally, Saturn can only be in the 7th (exalted) or the 10th (own). That’s two out of 12, or 16.7%. But in order for Virinchi to exist for this Aries ascendant, all three conditions must co-exist. The odds are again 0.333 x 0.333 x 0.167 = 1.85%, or less than one person in 50.

Srinatha requires the 9th lord (Jupiter in this case), along with Mercury and Venus, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

We’ve already shown that, for an Aries ascendant, Jupiter can fulfill its requirement 33.3% of the time. Meanwhile, Mercury can only be in the 5th (friendly) or the 7th (friendly). That’s two out of 12 signs, or 16.7%. Finally, Venus can only be in the 7th (own) or the 10th (friendly). That’s also two out of 12, or 16.7%. But in order for Srinatha to exist for this Aries ascendant, all three conditions must co-exist. The odds for that are 0.333 x 0.167 x 0.167 = 0.93%, or less than one person in 100.

That brings us back to the second graph, which shows that for an Aries ascendant to meet the specs for these spiritual yogas, the odds are 1.85% for Srikanta, plus 1.85% for Virinchi, and 0.93% for Srinatha, for a total chance of 4.63% to have one or the other. That’s just one person out of 22.

Now let’s see how all of these odds are altered by a different ascendant, with different lords of the 1st, 5th and 9th houses. See the template here for a Virgo ascendant.

Srikanta requires the Ascendant lord (Mercury in this case), along with the Sun and Moon, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

In this case, Mercury could be in the 1st (own/exalted), 9th (friendly), or 10th (own). That’s three out of 12 signs, or 25%. Meanwhile, the Sun could be in the 4th (friendly) or 7th (friendly). That’s two out of 12 signs, or 16.7%. Finally, the Moon could be in the 1st (friendly), the 9th (exalted), or the 10th (friendly). That’s three out of 12, or 25%. But in order for Srikanta to exist for this Virgo ascendant, all three conditions must co-exist. The odds for that are 0.25 x 0.167 x 0.25 = 1.04%, or one person in 100.

Virinchi requires the 5th lord (Saturn in this case), along with Jupiter and Saturn, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

Saturn could be in the 1st (friendly), the 5th (own), the 9th (friendly), or the 10th (friendly). That’s four out of 12 signs, or 33.3%. Meanwhile, Jupiter can only be in the 4th (own) or the 7th (own). That’s two out of 12, or 16.7%. And that’s all that’s required, because Saturn does double duty in this case, both as 5th lord and as itself. So in order for Virinchi to exist for this Virgo ascendant, only two conditions must co-exist. The odds for that are 0.333 x 0.167 = 5.56%, roughly one person in 18.

Srinatha requires the 9th lord (Venus in this case), along with Mercury and Venus, to occupy a kendra or trikona, and in their own, exalted or friendly (but not debilitated) sign.

Venus could be in the 5th (friendly), 7th (exalted), 9th (own), or 10th (friendly). That’s four out of 12 signs, or 33.3%. Meanwhile, Mercury could be in the 1st (own/exalted), the 9th (friendly), or the 10th (own). That’s three out of 12 signs, or 25%. And that’s all that’s required, because Venus does double duty in this case, both as 5th lord and as itself. So in order for Srinatha to exist for this Virgo ascendant, only two conditions must co-exist. The odds for that are 0.333 x 0.25 = 8.33%, roughly one person in 12.

That brings us back to the graph again, which says that for a Virgo ascendant to meet the specs for these spiritual yogas, the odds are 1.04% for Srikanta, plus 5.56% for Virinchi, and 8.33% for Srinatha, for a total chance of 14.93% to have one or the other. That’s roughly one person out of seven.

As we saw from the same graph, an Aquarius ascendant also offers some of the best chances for a horoscope to allow one or more of the three spiritual yogas. As an example, consider the chart below, that of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa.

To achieve Srikanta yoga, we need the Ascendant lord (Saturn), the Sun and Moon all in good signs and houses. In this case, both the Sun and Moon fail the test, so we must set that one aside.

For Virinchi yoga, we need the 5th lord (Mercury), Jupiter and Saturn all in good signs and houses. Mercury occupies a kendra in a friendly sign. Jupiter occupies a trikona but not a friendly sign, although it is strong by virtue of its retrogression. Meanwhile, Saturn is exalted in a trikona. Overall, this fails to fulfill the letter of the law, but because all three planets are strong by one measure or another, and all three occupy trikonas, we might consider this a somewhat diluted version of Virinchi.

For Srinatha yoga, this ascendant needs the 9th lord (Venus) and Mercury in good signs and houses. As we saw above, Mercury meets the specs. But Venus, although exalted, does not occupy a kendra or trikona, so it too fails to meet the rigorous definition. And yet many a jyotishi will nonetheless acknowledge that exalted Venus does at least occupy a positive house (as opposed to outright disqualification in a dusthana), and consider this a somewhat diluted version of Srinatha.

The takeaway from this example is that, however long the odds against the formation of a perfect Srikanta, Virinchi or Srinatha yoga, there may be mitigating circumstances that a discriminating jyotishi might consider. So long as the component planets largely fulfill the spirit of the law, the configuration might be considered yoga-like.

As they say in some circles, even the slightest stain on the white robe of a saint is a distraction from pure bliss. And yet that is the reality of our life on Earth.

~~~

Alan Annand studied with Hart de Fouw, and is a graduate of the American College of Vedic Astrology. He’s also a former tutor for the British Faculty of Astrological Studies, and the author of several books.

Kala Sarpa is a first-of-its-kind reference book on a unique pattern in jyotish that is not discussed in shastra yet is part of India’s rich oral tradition.

Stellar Astrology, Volumes 1 & 2, offer a wealth of time-tested techniques in the form of biographical profiles, analyses of world events, and technical essays. Parivartana Yoga is a reference text for one of the most common yet powerful planetary combinations in jyotish. His Mutual Reception is an expanded companion volume written for western practitioners, covering the same subject of planetary exchange through the lens of traditional astrology.

His New Age Noir crime novels (Scorpio Rising, Felonious Monk, Soma County) feature astrologer and palmist Axel Crowe, whom one reviewer has dubbed “Sherlock Holmes with a horoscope.”

Websites: www.navamsa.com, www.sextile.com

You can find his books on Amazon, Apple, Barnes&Noble, Kobo and Smashwords.

 

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